News - Page 8 of 9 - YMCA of Southwestern Indiana

How to Eat Healthy Without Breaking the Bank

Buy Fruit That's in Season as It Tends to Be Less Expensive

Why do healthier foods always seem to cost more? Is it possible to maintain a nutritious diet on a reasonable budget? The short answer…it is! Here are a few tips to help you stay health conscious AND on budget.

  • Buy and cook in bulk – At warehouse clubs like Sam’s Club and Costco, you can buy many items in bulk for much less. After buying in bulk, separate and freeze if needed.
    Spend a little time cooking dishes on the weekends that you can eat during the week, or freeze and use at a later date. A big bowl of bean soup or chili can be dinner as well as lunch for the next day or two. This saves on expensive frozen dinners, trips to the cafeteria, and last-minute detours to the drive-thru.
  • Manage the meat – Look for healthy meat like poultry and fish on sale, and freeze for later use to reduce waste. Also, consider swapping more expensive meats for other sources of protein like beans, tofu, or eggs.
  • Be season-savvy – Seasonal fruits and vegetables have the best taste, and are often much less pricey than imported out-of-season varieties. You can also look for lower-priced produce in the supermarket. It is usually a day or two old, but much less expensive. Try visiting local farmer’s markets, where produce is often cheap and fresh.
  • Go generic – Sometimes generic or private label store brands have the same ingredients that the big brand name products have, but because they aren’t paying the high advertising costs that the big brands are, they can charge less. In some cases, the same manufacturers produce both the generic products and the brand name.
  • Plan ahead – Menu planning can help reduce perishable product waste. Head to the store with a good idea of the meals you want to make for the week. Research shows that shoppers without a list tend to buy more food, especially snacks and impulse items!
  • Limit junk food – Junk food and prepared frozen foods can often add up to be the most expensive things in your cart. Trade the money you normally would spend on these items for fresh produce or healthy snacks. And try to avoid going to the store hungry, when it’s more difficult to resist temptation.

 

Source: UnitedHealthcare. Healthy Eating on a Budget. uhctool.com/nutrition_budget

Volunteering & Social Connectedness

  • Volunteerism is mutually beneficial – In addition to promoting good will, volunteering time and/or money an help connect you with your community. Even a litte volunteering can go a long way. But as it turns out, the more you contribute, the better you may feel. Studies show that people who do a lot of volunteering are mentally healthier.
  • Forming social connections – Volunteering can promote a sense of social connectedness for people of all ages. Just the act of contributing to something you are passionate about can have several positive impacts on your health.
  • Positive impact for kids and teens – Children who are encouraged to engage in volunteer activities are more likely to become active adults in their communities. More often than not, these individuals will have a larger and more prosperous social network. Connecting with an organization through volunteering can connect children and teens to a social network that they may otherwise miss out on. All in all, volunteering can positively impact the mental health and well-being of children  and teens.
  • It’s never too late to get involved – Volunteering is also an important way for aging adults to stay active in, and connected with their communities. Volunteering and staying socially-connected has shown to increase adults’ knowledge about health by connecting them with local services, building relationships, and providing emotional support.

 

Whether it’s volunteering at the Y or for another cause that you’re passionate about, you’ll not only benefit your community, but you own well-being too!

Volunteering & Social Connectedness

  • Volunteerism is mutually beneficial – In addition to promoting good will, volunteering time and/or money an help connect you with your community. Even a litte volunteering can go a long way. But as it turns out, the more you contribute, the better you may feel. Studies show that people who do a lot of volunteering are mentally healthier.
  • Forming social connections – Volunteering can promote a sense of social connectedness for people of all ages. Just the act of contributing to something you are passionate about can have several positive impacts on your health.
  • Positive impact for kids and teens – Children who are encouraged to engage in volunteer activities are more likely to become active adults in their communities. More often than not, these individuals will have a larger and more prosperous social network. Connecting with an organization through volunteering can connect children and teens to a social network that they may otherwise miss out on. All in all, volunteering can positively impact the mental health and well-being of children  and teens.
  • It’s never too late to get involved – Volunteering is also an important way for aging adults to stay active in, and connected with their communities. Volunteering and staying socially-connected has shown to increase adults’ knowledge about health by connecting them with local services, building relationships, and providing emotional support.

 

Whether it’s volunteering at the Y or for another cause that you’re passionate about, you’ll not only benefit your community, but you own well-being too!

Four Easy Ways to Prevent Summer Slide

Keeping youth fully engaged throughout June, July and August can prevent what educators refer to as “summer slide”. This common phenomenon refers to the loss of math and literacy skills when young minds are not engaged outside of school. In fact, youth can lose up to three months of these skills during the summer, which means their back-to-school performance is behind where they ended in the spring.

Summer slide is especially common in low-income communities where access to reading materials is more limited. Organizations from across the country have risen to meet this challenge through the creation of innovative, evidence-based summer learning loss prevention programs that work to eradicate the achievement gap and help all youth have the #BestSummerEver.

As youth development staff and volunteers, we believe that all children have potential and that it is our responsibility to nurture this potential so  that all kids, regardless of household income, can achieve success in school and in life. Summer learning loss efforts make us truly responsive to the diverse needs of our community.

Even if you don’t take part in one of our YMCA programs, here are four great ways to keep kids learning and growing all summer long:

  1. Explore Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM): You don’t need a lab coat or a Bunsen burner to implement activities that help to promote critical  thinking. Have fun exploring chemistry in the kitchen, take your kids on a nature scavenger hunt at a local park or spark learning about polymers by mixing corn starch and water to make ooblek! Always be sure to encourage your kids to observe, question, plan and investigate, analyze and communicate findings as they engage in new activities.
  2. Read Together: The summer is a great time to enjoy books with summer program participants – and 30 minutes of reading a day goes a long way! Take trips to the local library, or create a reading challenge to see who can log the most minutes of reading and encourage youth to create their own stories as well.
  3. Master Mathematics: Practicing fractions through baking, learning about basic computation through cooperative game playing and creating art projects involving tactile math are just some of the ways to make math magical this summer. Even the youngest children can get involved by playing games that involve pattern and sequence.
  4. Become Global Citizens: Exploring the amazing diversity of our own community can lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of a wide variety of cultures, or attend a festival celebrating countries youth would like to learn more about.

Combining beloved summer fun with engaging learning keeps youth interested and engaged all summer long, so they return to school in the fall on track and ready to learn more.

 

Keeping Kids on Track This Summer

When school ends, many children from low-income families lose access to resources important for positive development such as nutritious meals, adult supervision and activities that keep them engaged mentally.

Time away from school can contribute to the academic disparity that exists between children from low-income households , who often begin school less prepared, and their peers. Without intervention, the gap – know as the Achievement  Gap – widens, and kids from low-income backgrounds fall further behind.

As a leading nonprofit for youth development, the Y works to help all kids reach their fullest potential, nurturing their positive social-emotional, cognitive and physical development. Through the Summer Learning Loss Prevention program, the Y provides literacy and enrichment opportunities so children can build their academic skills, develop greater confidence in their abilities and get a strong start to the school year.

Studies show that by fifth grade, children from low-income households are on average two to three grade levels behind in reading compared to kids from middle-income households. In contrast, children who participated in the Y’s six-week Summer Learning Loss Prevention program in 2014 gained between two to three months in reading skills. Ninety-nine percent of caregivers agreed the program helped increase children’s reading skills, and 98 percent said it improved children’s attitudes about school.

In 2016, the YMCA of Southwestern Indiana served 100 kids through the Summer Learning Loss Prevention program. Other summer youth programs offered at our Y also incorporate these academic principles. To learn more about Y programs that help kids learn, grow and thrive during the summer, view this short video ».

8 Surprising Perks You Get from Exercise

We all know it’s good for you, but here are eight more compelling reasons to move your body on a regular basis.

Even if you’ve never experienced the elusive runner’s high, you probably know exercise can make you happier. Scientific research has shown there are countless connections between mind and body; to simplify a complicated process: exercise boosts dopamine and other chemicals in the brain that make us feel happier. What’s more, many kinds of exercise can put us in a wonderful “flow” state, which is one of the hallmarks of well-being, according to positive psychology.Beyond happy chemicals, though, here are eight more surprising ways exercise makes us happier.

1. Leads to achievements

When we have a goal, we become more engaged with life and excited about the future. Whether it’s jogging your first mile without stopping or exercising three times a week, having a goal initially sparks enthusiasm, and then making progress toward that goal really fuels our commitment and makes us feel good. It may even motivate us to plan and accomplish other goals!

2. Creates “me” time

Picture your exercise time as a mini-retreat for some healthy “me” time. We often think of “me” time as sitting by a fire with a cup of tea or reading a book, but a good sweat session can help you let go of stress, increase your energy and think with clarity. Even on those days when you aren’t in the mood to move, you will always feel better after you exercise, because when you feel fully charged, it’s much easier to be happy.

3. Retains your quality of life as you age

Staying in good cardiovascular shape and using your muscles can help prevent injuries and illness as you age. It also can help you with everyday movements (functional fitness) that involve lifting, carrying, bending and stretching as you get older. Retaining your quality of life is an essential ingredient to your future happiness.

4. Pushes you beyond your normal limits

Whether it’s going to a spin class, signing up for your first 5K or doing yoga for the first time, exercise is an opportunity to challenges yourself—to do something that scares you simply for the sense of exhilaration you’ll feel. When you do something outside your comfort zone, you may just surprise yourself with your abilities and gain an incredible sense of satisfaction and pride.

5. Leads to social connections

Gym memberships, group fitness classes, races, and running groups are all opportunities to connect with others, which is big when it comes to happiness. Be a part of a healthy group of friends and watch your mood soar.

6. Inspires those around you

Let your actions speak for you. Lace up your sneakers, go to the gym or take a long bike ride. Your children will notice. Show your kids that physical activity is something you value and they will value it as well. Plus, you never know who else you might be inspiring, such as a parent or coworker.

7. Builds up your self-confidence

Doing what you set out to do and sticking with it is the fastest way to invest in your self-confidence. Savor the amazing feeling of making exercise a habit, getting stronger or enjoying clothes again. As your muscles grow stronger, so will your self-esteem.

8. Brings out the kid in you

Remember the days of running around outside for hours and coming in smelling of fresh air? Tap into that childhood freedom by finding an exercise that feels more like play, whether it’s a game of pick-up basketball or a joyful Zumba class. Added perk? You will sleep like a baby.

Source: LiveHappy.com

Love Your Family with These Heart Health Tips

February is American Heart Month, and as a leading community-based organization dedicated to improving the Tri-State’s health, the YMCA of Southwestern Indiana offers the following tips to help families be heart healthy.

  1. Get Physical: Being physically active every day is fun and can improve the function of your heart. Plan and schedule opportunities for active play; for example, include a brisk 10-minute trip around the block after meals or a 10-minute walking break during the day. If your family enjoys active video games, select versions that require moving the body’s large muscle groups while playing.
  2. Take a Snooze: Lack of sleep can be associated with elevated cholesterol and blood pressure. Adults need at least seven, but no more than nine hours of sleep at night to aid with the prevention of heart disease. Children need 10-12 hours of sleep per night. Develop bedtime routines for the whole family to assist with falling asleep faster and staying asleep.
  3. Shape Up Those Recipes: Makeover your family’s favorite recipes by reducing the amount of salt and saturated fat and substituting a lower fat food without sacrificing tastes. For example, use low-fat yogurt instead of sour cream and skip the seasoning packet and use pepper and olive oil instead. Read food labels to learn more about what is in the package, select foods that have less than 1,000 mg of sodium per serving.
  4. Feeling the Pressure: Per the American Heart Association lowering or maintaining normal blood pressure can greatly reduce your risk for heart disease and stroke. Nearly 1 in 3 adults (about 80 million people) has high blood pressure and more than half of them don’t have it under control. Start self-monitoring your blood pressure and know the numbers. Discuss the results with you doctor if needed.
  5. Play Together: Spending time together as a family is a great way to reduce stress, which is important to heart health. Make homemade valentines for your children’s classmates or build a snow fort together in the yard or the park.

10 Survival Tips for Healthy Holiday Eating

The air is getting crisp and the leaves are changing colors in the Midwest, and that means holiday season is here! With all of the traditional holiday meals, treats, and parties this time of year, the holiday eating season can wreak havoc on our health. Avoid holiday weight gain with these savvy strategies for healthy holiday eating:

  • Plan Ahead – Visualize what you will do at the event or party before you arrive and focus more on good conversation instead of eating.
  • Don’t Starve Yourself – Eat a healthy snack or meal before an occasion involving food to help curb hunger so that you don’t binge on less healthy options.
  • Bring Your Own – Offer to bring an appetizer or healthy dish to serve so that you know there is something “safe” you can enjoy without the guilt.
  • Buddy Up – Make a goal with a friend so that you’re accountable to someone other than yourself!
  • Exercise – Sign up for a 5K, a fitness walk, or other fitness event to keep you motivated on exercise and to keep your body moving.
  • Limit Leftovers – Make your home a safe haven and send your guests home with the unhealthier leftovers to help limit temptations after entertaining.
  • Make Smart Substitutions – Practice healthier versions of your favorite dishes by cutting the sugar in recipes or replacing unhealthy vegetable oils and refined flours with healthier alternatives.
  • Choose Beverages Wisely – Limit alcohol, which is high in calories and is often combined with added sugar in the forms of fruit punch, juice, and egg nog.
  • Maintain Perspective – A single day of unhealthy choices doesn’t need to be a slippery slope of holiday overindulgence. If you overindulge, put it behind you and make better choices the next day.
  • Celebrate the True Meaning of Each Holiday – Focus more on friends and family, and celebrating the true spirit of this season than on the foods that are served.

Stress: Understanding the Cause Minimizing the Effects

Tense shoulders, lingering headaches, sheer exhaustion, comfort food cravings…every one of us has feelings of stress occasionally. For many, these are some of the most common symptoms. But as bad as these may be, the effect that long-term stress can have on our health goes far deeper. In fact, according to a recent study by researchers at Harvard Business School and Stanford University, workplace stress is as bad for your health as secondhand smoke!

EFFECTS ON THE BODY

When we’re stressed, our muscles tend to tense up, which is how we often feel it first in our shoulders and neck. It’s also why tension-related headaches and migraines are common.

Our brains also signal the nervous system to start producing epinephrine and cortisol. When these hormones are released, the liver produces more glucose – a blood sugar that provides the energy needed to react in a true emergency. But when stress is long-term, our bodies don’t use all that extra energy so the glucose gets stored in the liver and skeletal muscles as glycogen. When our glycogen stores are at capacity, all that leftover glucose ends up stored as fat in the body. This is part of the reason why it’s common to gain weight when we’re stressed for long periods of time.

As if that weren’t enough, long-term stress can also mean long-term damage to your heart. Momentary stress triggers an increased heart rate as part of the body’s ‘fight or flight’ response – a crucial function when our reaction is needed for survival. but when you body is stressed continuously for a long period, a faster heart rate and elevated levels of stress hormones can increase the risk for hypertension, heart attack, or stroke.

FACTORS THAT HELP MANAGE STRESS

We all experience varying levels of potential stressors. Your ability to tolerate each one without long-term stress depends on many factors including:

  • Your Support Network: A strong network of supportive friends and family can be an enormous buffer. On the flip side, the more lonely and isolated you are, the greater your vulnerability to stress.
  • Your Sense of Control: It may be easier to take stress in strife if you have confidences in your ability to influence events and perserveres through challenges. If you feel like things are out of your control, you’re likely to have less tolerance for stress.
  • Your Attitude & Outlook: optimistic people are often more stress-hardy. They tend to embrace challenges, have a strong sense of humor, and accept that change is part of life.
  • Your Ability to Deal with Emotions: You’re extremely vulnerable to stress if you don’t know how to soothe yourself when you’re feeling sad, angry, or overwhelmed by a situation. The ability to bring emotions into balance helps you bounce back from adversity.
  • Your Knowledge & Preparation: The more you know about a stressful situations, including how long it will last and what to expect, the easier it is to cope. For example, if you go into surgery with a realistic picture of what to expect post-op, a painful recovery will be less traumatic than if you are expecting to bounce back immediately.

LEARNING HOW TO MANAGE STRESS

Unfortunately, some of the common ways people deal with stress can only compound the long-term damage. Healthy stress management involves either changing the stressful situation when you can, or changing your reaction when you can’t.

Healthy ways to manage your stress:

  • Get moving
  • Engage socially
  • Set aside relaxation time
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Get plenty of sleep

 

Understanding what is actually causing your stress can also be a huge step towards managing it. Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now and A New Earth, said, “Stress is caused by being ‘here’ and wanting to be ‘there’.”

Take a minute for that to sink in. A lot of the stress that many of us regularly face can be tied to the desire for something that we don’t currently have; more money, better job, improved relationship, the pressure for perfection, more time, etc.

The answer isn’t necessarily to stop striving for things that are important to you, but rather to take regular pauses throughout the day to appreciate the right here, right now. What parts of your life are you grateful for right now?  How are you lucky or blessed?

STRESS QUIZ

How well do you handle the stress in your life?

  1. I have people I confide in when I’m feeling under pressure who make me feel better.
  2. I feel comfortable expressing how I feel when something is bothering me.
  3. in general, I feel in control of my life & confident in my ability to handle what comes my way.
  4. I find reasons to laugh & feel grateful, even when going through difficulties.
  5. No matter how busy I am, I make it a priority to sleep, exercise, and eat right.
  6. I’m able to calm myself down when I start to feel overwhelmed.

Each “yes” answer represents an important stress coping skill. Each “no” represents an area to work on to become more resilient.

Solving Childhood Obesity Is a Family Affair

Y USA 2011-1180_hrSeptember is Childhood Obesity Awareness Month, and while the dangers of childhood obesity are well chronicled, many families need support changing their children’s habits with the ultimate goal of improving health. That’s why the YMCA of Southwestern Indiana — a leading community-based organization dedicated to improving health—wants families to understand the dangers of childhood obesity and ways to reverse course through improved eating habits and increased physical activity.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), childhood obesity has more than tripled in children and adolescents over the past 30 years. Today, obesity affects one in six children and one in three are overweight, which poses greater risks for a number of health problems such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and some cancers.  Here in Indiana, over 13% of all children are considered overweight or obese, according to the Indiana State Department of Health.

The following tips are some great ways to incorporate healthier eating habits and more physical activity into your daily family routine:

  • Eat & Drink Healthy: Make water the drink of choice (supplemented by age-appropriate servings of low-fat milk) and make it easy for everyone to fill half their plates with fruits and vegetables by offering two or three colorful options at every meal. Feel free to mix and match fresh and frozen fruits and vegetables to provide variety. Place a full pitcher of water on the table during meals, and allow children to pour their own water.
  • Play Every Day/Go Outside: Kids should have at least an hour a day of unstructured play outside (when possible) and break a sweat at least three times a week by getting 20 minutes or more of vigorous physical activity. Join your children in games that get your hearts pumping and bodies moving.
  • Get Together: Eat as a family as frequently as possible. Involve kids in meal planning, preparation and clean up. In addition, adults should take a break from electronics and spend one-to-one time each day with their kids, enjoying one another’s company.
  • Reduce Recreational Screen Time: Time spent in front of a television, computer, tablet, cell phone or video games should be limited to two hours or less per day. Make a family plan to reduce screen time at home (i.e. turn off screens during meals, keep a chart, go for a walk after a meal).
  • Sleep Well: Kids and adults need to keep a regular sleep schedule; go to bed and rise from bed within 1 hour of the same time every day. Kids are growing and need 10-12 hours of healthy sleep per night and seven to eight hours for adults.