News - Page 9 of 9 - YMCA of Southwestern Indiana

What Healthier Kids Do Differently

The YMCA embraces a holistic approach to positive youth development. Our staff are professional role models who nurture the potential of each child on their unique journeys from birth to career. But the Y cannot do this work alone. Families and caretakers play a critical role in the development of youth.MemberEnews_Aug16_Family

As we head into the school year, the Y encourages families to adopt new health habits to help children and teens achieve success in all aspects of their lives. Here are three simple ways to get started:

  1. Be A Positive Role Model: Encourage health habits in your home with friendly competition and family challenges. Come up with your own challenges such as keeping track of who drinks more water, walks the most steps, or reads books more often.
  2. Reduce Screen Time: Children younger than 2 should have no exposure to TV, cell phones, or other digital devices. For children old than 2, the recommended screentime is less than one hour per day. Replace screentime with creative projects or at-home STEM activities.
  3. Encourage Choosing Water: When it comes to beverages, make water the primary option for yourself and your children. Unflavored low-fat or nonfat milk are also healthy choices. Limiting unhealthy beverage choices increases the likelihood that children will choose these options and develop healthier thirst-quenching habits.
DID YOU KNOW? By the time children turn 10, every extra hour of screentime they absorbed as toddlers translates into lower academic performance, reduced physical activity, and victimization by middle school peers.

Helping Men Make Health a Priority

Web-Men-Working-OutFather’s Day provide an opportunity to honor the important men in our lives. One way we can do this is by supporting their efforts to make their health a priority.

Celebrate National Men’s Health Week, June 13-19, by encouraging father, grandfathers, or other male role models to take a step each day to improve their health. Share these seven suggestions from the Centers for Disease Control and PRvention:

  1. Sleep – Getting less than seven to nine hours of sleep a night can contribute to a number of chronic diseases.
  2. Quit Smoking – Doing so improves your health immediately and lowers your risk for cancer, heart disease, and lung disease.
  3. Move – Adults need 2-1/2 hours of moderate-intensity aerobic activity every week in addition to muscle-strengthening exercises twice a week that target all major muscle groups.
  4. Healthy Eating – For nutritious meals that stay within calorie limits, choose a variety of nutrient-dense foods – including fruits, vegetables, and fish – in recommended serving sizes.
  5. Limit Stress – Avoid using drugs and alcohol to combat stress. instead, stay active and socially connected.
  6. Get Checkups – Doctor visits help identify diseases that may not show clear symptoms. Chest pain, shortness of breath or excessive thirst should be checked out right away.
  7. Track Numbers – Keep track of results for blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol, body mass index and other tests. If your numbers are out of the acceptable range, your health care provider can suggest ways to get them back to normal.

As a member of the Y, you are part of a diverse organization of men, women, and children joined together by a shared commitment to strengthening our community through youth development, healthy living, and social responsibility.

Three Ways Dad Influence a Child’s Development

Web-Dad-and-DaughtersThere are an estimated 70.1 million fathers across the U.S. As we prepare to celebrate dads, it is also a key moment for understanding the lasting and powerful influence a father has in the life of his child. Here are three critical ways dads impact youth development:

  • SOCIAL-EMOTIONALLY: Children with more involved fathers experience fewer behavioral problems and score higher on reading and achievement.*
  • COGNITIVELY: A father’s involvement in his child’s school is associated with higher likelihood of that child getting mostly A’s.*
  • PHYSICALLY: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth found that obese children are more likely to live in father-absent homes than are non-obese children.

 

Yet, not all children have the loving nurturing support of a father. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 24 million children in America — one out of every three — live without their biological fathers at home.

At the YMCA, we recognize that a young person’s development journey is negatively impacted when they do not receive the proper holistic support needed to reach their full potential. Through our youth development programs, we partner with families to ensure all children and teens have an opportunity to develop new skills, build strong friendships, and find their sense of belonging.

By supporting the socio-emotional, cognitive, and physical development of all youth, we support their success in school and life.

*Source: Fatherhood.org

Three Ways Dad Influence a Child's Development

Web-Dad-and-DaughtersThere are an estimated 70.1 million fathers across the U.S. As we prepare to celebrate dads, it is also a key moment for understanding the lasting and powerful influence a father has in the life of his child. Here are three critical ways dads impact youth development:

  • SOCIAL-EMOTIONALLY: Children with more involved fathers experience fewer behavioral problems and score higher on reading and achievement.*
  • COGNITIVELY: A father’s involvement in his child’s school is associated with higher likelihood of that child getting mostly A’s.*
  • PHYSICALLY: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth found that obese children are more likely to live in father-absent homes than are non-obese children.

 

Yet, not all children have the loving nurturing support of a father. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 24 million children in America — one out of every three — live without their biological fathers at home.

At the YMCA, we recognize that a young person’s development journey is negatively impacted when they do not receive the proper holistic support needed to reach their full potential. Through our youth development programs, we partner with families to ensure all children and teens have an opportunity to develop new skills, build strong friendships, and find their sense of belonging.

By supporting the socio-emotional, cognitive, and physical development of all youth, we support their success in school and life.

*Source: Fatherhood.org

Conquer Your Fear

Les Bryan Swimming at the YMCALes Bryan was 10-years old when he discovered his fear of water.  He didn’t really tell anyone and pushed his fears deep inside and avoided going near water.  Later in life, he realized that his fear of the water was hindering aspects of his life so he finally got the courage to take swimming lessons as an adult at the Dunigan YMCA.

When he first came to the Y, he was petrified. He was stiff and didn’t know how to move in the water.  After many prayers and time, a quiet confidence in the water started to emerge.  When Les would accomplish a goal, the pride he had was obvious. Soon, he began to swim well enough to learn a new stroke. After about 20 lessons, he had gone from terrified to accomplished swimmer. This was solidified when another swimmer took notice by asking, “How long will it take me to get that good?”  We had the swimmer repeat his question to Les himself, and the look on this face was priceless because Les too finally realized how far he had come.

When it comes to fear, it’s wonderful to see someone rise above what has kept them in a dark, negative mindset for so long. Les’ determination and drive allowed him to overcome many fears that were hidden for 40 years.  We are so privileged to see an adult transform into someone who is confident and strong, and we are so thankful we could be a part of Les’ journey.

It’s never too late to learn something new, achieve a goal, or conquer a fear!

Member Loses Almost 100 Lbs Through Aquatics

Rose-Before-and-After-PhotosRose McCrary first started coming to the Y about 5 years ago.  At that time, she weighed over 240 lbs. She just wanted to lose some weight and reduce the amount of medication she was taking for various problems. Traditional exercises made her hurt all over so she tried the pool. She found that she could move almost effortlessly in the water. In the pool she made new friends and discovered that she loved working out in the water. Then, the weight started coming off, and that motivated her to make even more changes in her life. She realized that her body is a machine that she needed to take care of so she stopped eating junk food and started eating healthier. Now, she comes to the pool twice a week and has discovered her body can do things she never thought she could…like do 400 sit ups in 8 minutes. She’s down to 150 lbs and no longer has to take ANY medications.

Rose’s story proves that dedication and hard work really do pay off. We are so proud of her and honored to be part of her journey.  We love to interact with our members, listen to their stories, and help them towards their goals…whatever they may be.  Everyone has a story, and we want to be a part of it.