Lisa Verkamp, Author at YMCA of Southwestern Indiana

COVID-19 Update: Spring Break Camps Cancelled

At the YMCA, the health and well-being of our staff, members, program participants, and community is our utmost priority. As we navigate the rapidly evolving coronavirus (COVID-19) situation together, we wanted to share an important update with you.

Like many other organizations in our community right now, we find ourselves continually evaluating our available resources. For the Y, our most valuable resource is our staff. With a varying workforce trained in educational protocols, child safety, and lifesaving skills, we are in a unique position to help during this time when school is out of session, but we recognize that demand for childcare services and activities far exceeds what we can provide to everyone. As an organization that responds to community needs, we feel our resources should be directed where our community needs it the most during this time, which are to essential community personnel like healthcare workers and emergency responders.

We have partnered with Ascension St Vincent and Deaconess Health System to be able to provide childcare services during this time to their essential personnel, and with the cooperation of the EVSC, we will be using a few specific school sites to do so.

Given the need to re-allocate some of our human resources for the greater good of our community, we will be cancelling the following Spring Break programming.

Over March 23rd-27th, we will be cancelling Spring Break Camps including Full Day camps through our Childcare Services branch, 2-Day Spring Break Sports Camps for basketball, volleyball, soccer, and gymnastics and our $10 Open House Clinics for basketball, volleyball, and soccer.

Further disruption and changes to our programming and member services may occur without much notice. To stay informed, we encourage you to regularly check this website for potential changes to program and activity schedules along with the CDC (www.cdc.gov/coronavirus) and Indiana Department of Health (www.in.gov/isdh) websites for important updates and safety information. The YMCA will also send notifications through email, mobile app, and our Facebook page.

We ask for your grace and patience as we all navigate through these unprecedented circumstances. Let’s all work together to keep everyone healthy and safe.

Benefits of Personal Yoga Training

Although our YMCA offers 50+ yoga classes free to members, some individuals may find personal yoga training more appealing. Private lessons are a one on one experience that can improve one’s mental and physical health and achieve personal yoga goals. Other benefits of Personal Yoga Training include:

  • Gaining initial experience – Beginning yoga students can sometimes feel overwhelmed in typical class settings. Personal training  can help learning poses, timing and breathing, and jumpstart flexibility.
  • Focusing on personal goals – A private lesson allows an individual to set specific goals and plans, such as personal goals for flexibility, strength or meditation.
  • Creating a personalized schedule – Making the time to practice is a vital element of yoga. If it’s not possible to get to one of our many classes, then a private lesson can accommodate even the most hectic of schedules.
  • Overcoming health concerns – Health conditions like pregnancy, diabetes or heart disease may require special alterations to one’s yoga practice. Personal yoga training addresses health conditions to avoid further complications.
  • Working on advanced practice – Private instruction can allow individuals to take their yoga practice to the next level. Specific yoga classes might not always offer the level of challenge and planning for advanced practitioners.

Contact Christen Mitchell to schedule your private lessons today.

2020 February Scripture of the Month

This is how we know what love is; Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters.

– 1 JOHN 3:16

Unplug to Find Connection

The holidays are all about spending quality time with family and friends in your community, but technology and screen time can get in the way. At the Y, members like you – of all ages, backgrounds and walks of life – can set the virtual world aside to make lasting, meaningful connections in real life.
Here are a few ideas for making deeper connections this holiday season:
Try something new

Consider trying a new sport of fitness programs at your Y. A new experience can help you and your family connect with each other, meet new people and stay active!

Volunteer

The Y is a volunteer-led organization that benefits communities with many opportunities to make a difference. Ask the front desk about ways to give back alongside your neighbors.

Make friends

Have you thought about striking up a conversation with someone new in the lobby of your Y or after a great class but weren’t sure how to begin? Chances are,  you’re not alone. Try these conversations starters and you’ll be making connections in no time:

  • What’s your favorite holiday tradition?
  • What was your favorite volunteer experience?
  • Were you a Y kid growing up?

Dunigan Wellness Center Will Be Closed for A Day for Maintenance

The Dunigan Wellness Center will close at 8AM on Oct 24, 2019 and re-open at 5AM on Oct 25, 2019 in order to spruce up, clean, and redesign the Wellness Center.

All other facility hours, programming, group exercise classes, etc will operate as normal. The Dunigan Wellness team appreciates your patience while we work to create a more inviting and user friendly Wellness Center. We look forward to showing you our redesigned space on Friday, October 25th at 5am.

7 Quick Ways to Boost Your Energy

Americans are tired — seriously. Three out of four of us reported feeling tired many days of the week, according to a survey of more than 1,000 people. And while healthy habits — like staying active, eating well, and getting enough sleep — are the most meaningful ways to boost your energy, it is possible to feel perky and refreshed in a matter of minutes. And, no, we don’t mean by reaching for the nearest energy drink.

Giggle at Cats

Seriously. Nodding off at your desk? Take a few minutes to indulge in whatever goofy of-the-moment online meme or video trend you’re currently obsessed with. Cat videos? Go for it. Watermelon dresses? Enjoy.  A 2015 study published in the Journal of Business and Psychology found that the exposure to humor doesn’t just make you feel better, it actually has replenishing and energizing effects. In fact, the study goes so far as to recommend that organizations embrace a work culture of playful moments to keep employee persistence high.

Down a Glass of Water

In addition to benefiting your muscles, joints, and heart health, water is imperative to keep you alert and energized during the day, says Lori Zanini, RD, a nutritionist and certified diabetes educator. “Your fluid intake can benefit your body immediately,” in part because it may help protect against high blood sugar, she says.

And even mild dehydration can leave you dragging. A 2011 study by the University of Connecticut and the University of Arkansas found that dehydration can quickly lead to a decline in mood, an increase in fatigue, and in increase in the perceived difficulty of cognitive tasks. Meaning, not only will you probably check off your list of to-do things at a slower rate, but the task will feel more daunting than it really is. Feeling a little parched when your energy slumps? Drink up!

Smell Peppermint

Here’s a weird one: The aroma of mint, researchers found, may enhance memory, and increase alertness. And other studies have linked peppermint oil to greater physical performance, as well. Put a few drops of essential peppermint oil on a diffuser, then let the energizing aroma do its thing!

Take the Stairs

Feeling sluggish? Start climbing. A study by researchers at the University of Georgia’s College of Education found that office workers who walked up and down stairs at a comfortable, low-intensity pace finished the task feeling energized. In fact, stair climbers felt more recharged than participants who downed 50 milligrams of caffeine, which is about the amount in a standard cup of coffee or soda. So next time you’re feeling sluggish, put your feet to work.

Go Ahead and Sip a Cup of Joe

Speaking of coffee: For most people, there’s no need to feel guilty about getting a quick pick-me-up from a cup of joe. Two separate 2017 studies found that drinkers of coffee — which is full of good stuff like antioxidants — may actually have longer lives than non-drinkers. Just be mindful of the clock when you’re drinking caffeine, says Rania Batayneh, MPH, nutritionist and author of The One One One Diet. “Having coffee in the late afternoon or evening can interfere with your sleep later on.” So this is an energy boost best used in the morning.

Upgrade Your Snack

If you’ve been munching chips all afternoon or are feeling ravenous, your energy slump might be crashing blood sugar, says Zanini. For an energy boost that won’t leave you bottomed up in an hour, reach for a snack that includes fiber and protein, she says. Both digest slowly, which means your blood sugar won’t spike (and then plummet), and they’ll leave you feeling sated for longer.

Hummus and whole-wheat crackers or carrots is Batayneh’s energizing snack of choice, or a piece of fruit and a handful of almonds. If you can sneak in some extra water, more energy to you. “Cucumbers and watermelon are mostly water,” says Zanini, “so they deliver an extra hydration boost as well.”

Embrace Nature

Researchers have found that simply being outside and in nature can boost vitality. The sights and sounds of nature, it seems, have a calming impact on our bodies and minds. (Not to mention, an extra small dose of Vitamin D may be a welcome bonus.)

The benefits of nature can even help your energy levels if you’re stuck in the house or at your desk all day. In 2015, researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that playing natural sounds — a flowing stream, for example — in an inside environment can lead to increased productivity.

Source: Rally Health, Kate Rockwood, July 3, 2018